Ice Castle

I was in another world […] that was tinted with the lightest shade of a mystical blue […].  The people here wore the most elaborate […] costumes – rich gowns of a silky, sparkling material that flowed […] past the ankles, with wide shoulder pieces and detailed [headsets].  There were either no men, or very few.  Their entire palace, or perhaps, the entire kingdom, was like an ice castle set in snow. […]

I entered a gigantic room with a tremendously high ceiling.  Floating […] within this room were numerous, glowing organisms – like dozens of jellyfish within a giant, aquatic tank.  This seemed like a place for dancing or for just relaxing […], for there were other people in bright shades of green and red, among other colors, walking around and doing nothing in particular.  I walked […] to the back […] and looked up […] I saw a cage hanging in the corner near the ceiling.  Something, or someone, was imprisoned inside – […] I hitched a ride on one of those glowing jellyfish, which were constantly rising towards the top, like bubbles in a soda bottle.  I rose […] above almost everything until I reached the cage to talk to its inhabitant.  I don’t remember who the prisoner was, or what we discussed, but I remember thinking the prisoner’s fate unfair.

I wasn’t the only one in this strange land.  I was with my friends, dressed in those elaborate outfits.  […] for some reason, we were trying to escape […] and it was difficult.  I remember being caught by the empress and her servants – four or five of them blocking our escape through a snowy passageway. […]

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The Eskimo and the Stars

I remember seeing a lot of My Little Ponies dancing […] animated and full of color.  It was like I had fallen straight into a cartoon of My Little Pony.  There was one that […] was white with a purple mane and just one silver hoof in front, while all her other hooves were white.  When she dug this silver hoof into the cartoon dirt, the hoof sparkled […].

At some point, [I found myself in] a cold, wintry landscape covered with a thick layer of snow and ice.  Cutting through the middle of this frozen landscape was a great chasm bridged by a […] little wooden bridge that was old, rickety, and worn down by the ice that clung to its surface .  All this was beneath a sky that was pale blue and grayish – stark […].

I saw an Eskimo girl riding through the snow […] on a great wooden sled that was not like a sled at all.  It was huge […] – much larger than the girl – composed seemingly of a loose, shaky bunch of wooden crates and wooden boards that shook violently as this odd sled skimmed across the snow at a dangerously fast pace.  A large chunk broke off the back of her sled and […] I remember wondering whether she was able to handle the sled by herself […].  This small girl took the leather reins in her hands and pulled on them […] – and for an instant I thought that she would be okay.  But then [the] […] towering sled skidded across the ice and tipped over, sending the girl plunging into the abyss […].  She clung to the edge of the other side of the rift, her brown gloves gripping at the ice. […]

The next I remember, I was running beneath a clear night sky […].  I had a feeling that I was running towards the stars and if I reached them, I could be free, and it felt like I was getting closer […].  I sang to the stars as I ran […].  I knew that there were a few trees scattered among several modest houses behind me – that I shouldn’t be running from these things – but I had to run – the stars drew me out.  I was also aware that there was a little girl running behind me, trying to keep up.  She was small and afraid and she didn’t want to run.  It was hard to run, the houses and the trees drew me back, but I pushed forward […].

It felt like I was getting closer to where the sky arched over the earth and the closer I got to the stars the more vivid their constellations became to me.  They formed […] sparkling shapes […].  Silver lines connected the stars across the night sky, defining the constellations […].  A few of these silver lines became flashes of brilliant scarlet that streaked across the blackness – thin, red lines that seemed to rain onto the earth.  I watched as these constellations shifted before my eyes as if I was standing inside a kaleidoscope of stars.

A red streak flashed in the sky and […] an identical streak flashed beside me.  I heard the little girl behind me call my name frantically.  “We’ve gone beyond the bounds!” she cried.  […] Perhaps she was the Eskimo girl […].  I knew she was my friend and that she was telling me we had to go back.

And so we went back […] to the trees and the little wooden shacks.  Inside one of the shacks was a pair of bunkbeds […] directly after one passes through the front screen door.  It was a dirty place.  I sat down on one of the bunkbeds – the lower bunk – while the girl sat in the other lower bunk.  Instead of mattresses, there were those Japanese bamboo mats – “ta ta mis.”  The blanket was made out of wood too, as was the house and the […] bunkbeds.  As I sat down,  I remember thinking about torture and punishment, but I was more annoyed than afraid.  I […] knock[ed] a China bowl filled with dead insects onto the floor […], where it tipped over and spilled its contents out.  Those things had been on my bamboo bunkbed and they were used to torture us.

It wasn’t long before two men burst into the room and screamed, “You’ve been out of bounds!” […].  They talked with each other to decide who would administer the torture.  But then they didn’t seem to care anymore.  They seemed more like friends or acquaintances than captors.  I pointed at something out the window to distract them and they […] left.

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