I think it was the early eighteen hundreds because of the way the townspeople were dressed.  I was in one of those large dresses typical of that time – nothing fancy or elaborate but not too dull at the same time.  It looked like some sort of simple festival was going on at the town square – for a bunch of men and some women were all clustered together in the midst of some active game, all running across the cobbled streets with laughs and cries of exhilaration.  I was among the spectators who crowded around the players, clapping my hands and [craning] my neck to catch a glimpse of what was going on.  For a moment, I took a brief pause in my excitement and stepped back to the fringes of the crowd where I deliberately made the decision to stand next to a German man whom I knew to be Ludwig van Beethoven.  I didn’t look at him or pay special attention to him – just kept my neck [craned], my eyes focused ahead, and my hands clapping.  He looked at me calmly, at how excited and happy I was, and then he said, “Would you like to come to dinner with me?”  I was astounded, aghast – and altogether thrilled as I accepted his invitation.


I remember being in a store with him once – it looked strikingly modern, like a [JCPenney] or the makeup section at Macy’s.  There were whitewashed walls and long counters with mirrors and jewelry.  Beethoven and I were laughing and joking as I led him up to one of the counters and I looked at myself in a small mirror propped up on the countertop.  It was one of those typical mirrors that department stores usually have on their make-up countertops – with those fake gold-metal linings.  The reflection that I saw was a young girl in her late teens who was as cute as anything.  She resembled me in a way, only much lovelier, and with a face that was all smiles.  No wonder Beethoven loves me, I thought.  I’m prettier than anything.  My dark hair was done in elaborate braids – pulled back in two fishbones, I think, that ran across the sides of my head.  It was hard to tell exactly what hairstyle I had from the reflection.

Beethoven […] reached forward and picked up a set of beautiful earrings – one in each hand.  They were small hoop earrings, studded with rows and rows of tiny diamonds – they were absolutely gorgeous.  He held them up next to my face, right underneath my ears – and they made me look even more lovely.  “Oh, they’re wonderful!” I exclaimed.  “They’re so beautiful!”  And so he bought them for me.

The next thing I remember, we were in a bookstore together – a modest one with wooden walls and a single storekeeper behind a small, wooden counter – early nineteenth century again.  I think [Beethoven] was looking out a window, all sullen and worried, and I was coming to the realization that he was deaf.  I noticed that he never responded to anything I said unless he could see and read my lips. […]

Napoleon was invading and we were grim as we stood in the bookstore.  Beethoven wanted to save the books from being burned and so […] we pulled the books from the shelves in a frenzy, loading as many as we could into a cloth bag that I carried.  I asked him some urgent question that I can’t quite remember – something like, “But what if they don’t know…?”  I was referring to Napoleon’s troops.  However, Beethoven couldn’t hear me.  I touched him on the shoulder so that he turned and looked at me while I repeated my question.  But the time was too chaotic and I said it too fast – he did not understand me – was unable to read what I had to say.  He embraced me anyways and told me what to do with the books.  Then he left ahead of me, walking out the front door.  I remember thinking about how misunderstood the man was.  And I remember seeing a glimpse of myself running after him in my big long dress – down a dirt road in the middle of town.  As I ran, I thought, Who would’ve known that from dinner would come this? […]  And I was so glad he had asked me to dinner.

Then I was back at the bookstore, walking out the front door and leaving the books next to the front steps in a bag that was now plastic.  It was what Beethoven had told me to do.  I looked out at the town and saw a great many people lying dead or dying upon the ground – civilians that Napoleon’s troops had slain.  To my left I saw a woman on the ground […].  To my right, Beethoven was making his way among these dead – hurrying towards a particular building.  I picked up my skirt and ran after him.  As I did so, I noticed that my skirt felt like plastic bags. […]

I followed Ludwig into the building, which was all fancy and lavishly adorned inside – like a nineteenth century palace.  There were a number of gentlemen in a particular room going about business – dressed in suits appropriate for the time.  As Ludwig entered, one of the gentlemen – rather round in face and feature – approached him and greeted him with, “How’s that ringing in your ears, Sir?”  Apparently, they either did not know of Ludwig’s condition or were making fun of him for it.

Ludwig ignored the man and proceeded to the desk of another gentleman who was taller, more well-built, and more business-like than the previous gentleman.  This man had a dark mustache and wore over one eye a spectacle attached to a cord.  Beethoven threw what looked like a manuscript in front of the man upon his desk.  The two argued about the books Beethoven had been trying to save.  There was some elaborate scheme, but ultimately, the gentleman wound up taking the credit for rescuing the books.

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It was the early 1800s on a day that was bright, sunny, and absolutely gorgeous.  I sat at a large, grand piano on a green lawn right at the edge of the woods – the beautiful backyard of some wealthy family.  I played the piano, my fingers running along the keys, and as I did so, I was aware of the scent and shape of blossoming flowers.  It was such a tranquil and relaxed atmosphere.  My audience was only several people who were not overly attentive, but just casually listening or wandering about – the ladies dressed in their elaborate nineteenth-century gowns, flapping their fans and politely chatting, a few children running across the grass, and just one or two gentlemen strolling here and there in their black suits with coat-tails.

I was approaching the last line of my piece – a left-hand run across the keyboard – when I heard loud thumping noises interjecting into my music.  It sounded like the marching of a whole troop of soldiers.  I wanted to look up to assess the oncoming threat, but even more so, I wanted to finish playing the piece.  However, the urgency I felt towards the oncoming danger was too strong to resist and I dashed off the run in a blundered hurry.

Looking up at a trail that twisted into the serene […] woods, I saw an army marching straight towards us – in the uniform style – rifles, boots, and coats – typical of that time.  “It’s Napoleon’s army!” I cried in a panic.  “Napoleon’s army’s come to invade us!”  I ran from the piano to a group of women who sat on a stone garden bench.  Sitting down with them, I saw that one of my stuffed animals – an Easter bunny I named Jellybean – sat at my right.  I hugged her close to me, and all of a sudden, in a strange way, she became like the children.

The next thing I remember was everything was chaos and people were being slaughtered everywhere.  We were all running across gently sloping hills of that same green-lawn grass bordered by the delicate, whispering beauty of those same woods.  But the presence of the house, the patio, the backyard feel, and definitely the piano – were all gone.  It was just wide open space – seemingly a giant field of trim lawn across which we ran hectically, in every direction, in a panic for our lives.  We no longer wore our fancy clothes, but only the dullest, most typical things of the blandest colors – brown shirts, gray pants, tan colors – peasant clothes.  In front of me, I saw vividly, a soldier stab a man in the lower back, the sword sliding straight through the man’s body, emerging from his belly in a bloody burst as his eyes bulged and his mouth gaped open in pain.

Suddenly, the soldiers began to shoot arrows, and these arrows rained down upon us.  I caught one in my lower back but I kept running – the thing jutting out behind me.  Lucky it missed my spine, I thought.  It was a long and painful thing sticking out of my back, and it hindered me as I ran.  I reached behind me and broke off the arrow above my flesh, but a larger part of it was still inside of me.  Lucky I can still run, I thought […].

Then I noticed that it wasn’t arrows the soldiers were firing anymore, but giant, wooden javelins […].  There was a female commander wearing peasant[] clothes, and at her command, the soldiers behind her launched their javelins into the air.  I found myself running with a group of about a dozen others, all scrambling about in a confused frenzy – not knowing what to do.  I don’t quite remember what happened – there was a mistake – an accident […].  But suddenly, I saw a javelin mistakenly pierce through the female commander’s body – the head of the weapon slicing through her heart from behind and piercing through her chest.  The soldiers gasped and blamed us for their mistake, seeking vengeance by firing [a] […] torrent of wooden spears upon us.

We screamed […] [and] we turned and fled towards the edge of the woods.  For some reason, I did not turn like the others.  I ran backwards, facing the onslaught of javelins that flew just inches from my body until I reached the woods with the others.  There, I turned and fled into the forest, the great trees surrounding me.  Everywhere, people were scattering among the trees, dodging into the darkness.  I could still feel the arrow in my back and the presence of the javelins chasing us into the woods.

All the while, throughout all this, the sun was shining brilliantly, the sky was a clear blue, and the weather was perfect.

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[Alice] and I were part of our school’s musical groups which decided to take a field trip to perform at a very beautiful place, by the looks of which I took to be […] Washington D.C.  It was nighttime when I was scheduled to perform with the orchestra but my right arm was feeling sore.  [Alice’s] father’s arm had recently been amputated and she had it with her, for some reason.  Since my arm was sore, I asked [Alice] if I could borrow her father’s and she consented.  Thus I played through the concert using [his] arm.

Afterwards, I think it was (I’m not sure of the chronology here), I walked from the concert hall around the building until I saw [Alice] standing next to a set of windows, staring outside amongst rows of seats […].  [I] asked her what it was she was looking at out there in the night. […] she said to me, drawing away from the window […], “My father has a job interview today and I’m afraid he’s not going to make it through.  I’m afraid he’s going to show up drunk and he’s not going to make it through, you know, the counting part.”

“Is he here?” I asked, looking out the window.  I saw that the view contained a building with several men gathered around in their suits and ties, holding onto cocktails as they clustered around […].  It seemed to be a business meeting of sorts.  I scanned the men, looking for [Alice’s] father.

“You can’t see him from here […]!” she said to me.  In other words, he wasn’t here in D.C.  I think that I gave [Alice] her father’s arm back and she put it in a refrigerator.  All the while, I held for her a soft drink which had words on the lid saying something along the lines of “He will lend his arm,” or perhaps it was, “He who is strong, kind, nurturing… will lend a helping arm” – some saying such as that.

The next thing I remember was that [Alice] and I were outside, walking through the night air among those white, pillared buildings which were lit with fluorescent, glowing lights that shone a soft illumination in the gentle evening darkness.  There were other students strolling outside after the concert.  We were all walking around a giant, rectangular pool whose calm surface reflected the quiet darkness of the sky above. […]  I said to [Alice] earnestly, “I have to tell you something important, but I have to hurry, because this dream is about to end.”

I can’t remember what it was I meant to tell her. […] But my alarm clock was ringing and I struggled for a moment there between the waking world and the dream world before finally giving in to the world of dreams.

I awoke in my dream because [Alice’s] parents were calling me on the telephone.  It was dark when I sat up in bed to talk to [them] on the other end of the line.  They told me that [Alice] had forgotten where she had left the arm back at D.C. and they were wondering if I remembered.  “Yeah, I remember,” I told them, and resurrected a memory of the beautiful building with all the great, white pillars lit up in night lights – the place where we had left the arm.  My memory scanned through the area – across the wide, glowing steps that led to buildings resembling those of ancient Greece – all glowing in a peaceful, starry night.  “It was in the third house all the way back,” I finished, referring to the arm and its location.  They were going to come to pick me up so that I could give them directions as to where that arm was.  They were planning on driving all the way back down to Washington with me.

I hung up the phone and just sort of [lay] there in bed for a good long while before I remembered they were coming to get me and thus I should get dressed.  I got up but couldn’t seem to find anything to wear, so I threw on a whole jumble of shirts and a pair of cotton shorts that made me feel as though I’d be cold if I went outside.  That’s alright, I figured to myself.  I’d only be out there for a short period of time.  As I was fumbling around, getting dressed, I opened a drawer at the head of my bed and there, encased in ice, sat [Alice’s] father’s arm.  I must have taken it out of the drawer and set it on my bed, on top of all my sheets, for that was where I remembered seeing it next.  It didn’t even look like an arm at all – it seemed more like an odd-looking, clear cup filled with ice, ice-cream, and mint-chocolate chips.  Still though, I was a bit disgusted and taken-aback at what I knew that icy package contained within.  “C’mon, Theresa,” I told myself, “it’s just an arm.”  Looking out the window, I saw that [Alice’s family] had already pulled into my driveway in a silver, sporty car and apparently had already been waiting for me for quite some time.  I did take my time, I thought, and wondered why they hadn’t come to ring my doorbell and hurry me along.  But at least I had the arm and now we didn’t have to drive all the way to Washington to get it.

I picked it up off the bed and carefully brought it down the stairs, stepping outside barefooted onto a ground covered by a thin layer of snow.  I was aware that my parents were sleeping inside the house and that they didn’t know I was awake and out here.  But I’ll only be a second, I thought.  They don’t need to know.  I opened the back door of the car and sat down next to [Alice].  Her younger brother sat on the other side of her while her parents occupied the two front seats, her father at the driver’s seat.  They all turned and greeted me in a most friendly, cheerful manner as I entered the car and handed the arm to the parents.  They were most happy and pleased to have the arm back and they thanked me generously – her father even offering to pay me, taking out a little bag of coins and throwing some money my way.  I refused it, of course – after[ ]all, it was I who had borrowed it in the first place and if anybody paid anybody, it should be [me] […].

“Well, why don’t we drive Theresa to our house,” [Alice’s] mother suggested.  Thus, they did.  It seemed like a rather long drive over.  All I remember was that the parents spoke to each other in a strange, foreign language – exactly the way my parents spoke to each other.  [Alice] leaned forward in her seat and said something to her parents in that same, odd language – the words of which I actually did understand, somewhat.

“[Alice], what language are you speaking!” I asked.

She paused and looked at me out of the corner of her eye as if offended by my half-question half-exclamation.  “Romanian,” she said, as though the answer was obvious.

“Really?” I responded.  ” ‘Cause that’s exactly how my parents talk to each other […] and the funny thing is that I actually understood some of the words!”  I sat back and wondered how this could be, picturing a map of Eastern Europe in my head.  Well, I figured, Romania is very close to where my parents come from (Taiwan), so there would logically be similarities in the language.  I was quite satisfied with my reasoning […].

Finally, we turned into a beautiful housing development that paralleled the Kennewyck development near my house in reality.  We pulled up to [Alice’s] house in her driveway and everyone got out of the car except for her father – he was going to take me back directly and it made me greatly upset […].  I watched as [Alice] walked […] towards her house with her family.

Then, all of a sudden, I was with them, standing on the front porch.  [Alice’s] father gave her mother the keys and told her not to forget to ask me the “big question.”  I remember feeling as though they were going to ask permission to borrow money from my family.  But my family’s poor, I remember thinking.  We wouldn’t be able to give you anything.

Somehow, there came to be a change of plans.  They invited me in to stay for a[]while and I saw that their house was beautiful – filled with all sorts of lovely furniture and lit with a warm, glowing light.  I sat on a stool in the middle of all this and spun around on it to take in all the rooms of the house.  I saw that [Alice’s] mom was holding a new baby and that [Alice] was preparing a bottle for it.  […] – the furniture was new, expensive, and abstract, of all colors, shapes, and sizes, filling the house in such a way that it should have made it cluttered but did not.  It had a real familiar feel to it […].  I spun around on my stool when it hit me.  “Oh my god!  This is [Natalie’s] house!” I exclaimed. […] “Wow, I dunno what’s wrong with me,” I continued, laughing.  “I’m just slow.  I mean, I thought this place looked familiar.”  Of course, [Natalie’s] family had sold their house and [Alice’s family] had first dibs [on] buying it.  With a house like this, I thought, no wonder they’re having financial problems.

I spun around some more on my stool, quite pleased to be where I was.  Once, I glanced down at my legs and was briefly surprised to find myself wearing a warm pair of blue speedos […] instead of the shorts I thought I had put on earlier.

One last thing I’d like to add about this dream.  I remember, when [Alice] and I were in Washington, we were […] outside with a group of other people my age and we all held hands in a single row of about six or seven.  It was in the middle of a large courtyard that we stood, there on the lawn with several trees[,] and parked in front of us was a psychedelic van whose colors were dulled by the night.  We ran towards that van, all holding hands in a row […].  I talked about the concert as I ran forward with the others.  “I mean, it didn’t even feel like I was playing [violin] with someone else’s arm,” I said to the group.  “It’s kind of disgusting if you think about it.”  And then we ran up the side of the van – all of us, in a great rush, just up and over.

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Western Themed

I was inside […] one of those Western bars in those classic Western towns.  Except the “people” here were rather different.  In fact, they weren’t people at all, but instead, these strange, odd-looking[,] monster-like creatures.  They weren’t scary, just ugly.  One of them I remember in particular – a […] large thing that had thick, green skin with warts.  He had really thick lips and wore the typical Western attire – a cowboy hat and the classic vest and boots.  He sat in a chair with a keg of beer in his hand which he rested on top of his stomach.  He was sort of like [Jabba the Hutt], from Star Wars […].  Most of the monsters looked like him – however, varying in sizes and skin color.  One of them was a distinct blue.

I remember seeing a human woman who was in the bar wearing Western men’s clothes. […] she was intimidating a rather unkempt, drunken male criminal with her pistol before he gave her whatever it was she wanted.  He was cowering from her, with his back pressed against the bar counter when she took off her hat and shot a flaming hole through the bottom of it with her gun.  For some reason, this showed that her pistol hadn’t been loaded at all and that it was all just a bluff.  She smiled from beneath her head of thick, dark hair before putting her hat back on and turning on her heel to stroll from the [saloon].  The man, with his stubbly beard, became incensed that he had been tricked.  He pulled out his own gun and shot at the woman as she fled through the swinging doors.

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A Fallen Fairy and Flowers

I was watching this dream the way I watch many of my dreams.  I was inside of a cave – a rather large one whose walls glowed red and hot.  In the center of it, the ground fell out to reveal a deep chasm that burned with fire and scorching embers.  Seemingly nailed high up on the cave walls were […] fairies – thin, delicate, pretty creatures – all hung in a row that encircled the cave.  And from the ceiling there grew the strangest organism – the master of this cave – a thing that was half plant, half animal – tremendously large, nearly filling its entire cave.  It was like a mammoth spider that hung from the ceiling, except instead of legs, it had branches filled with the most beautiful flowers that possessed all sorts of colors and had parts that shimmered and glowed when caught at the right angles.  These branches came in bundles and hung limply like willow wands – each bundle grew its own kind of exotic flower so the flowers were the same within bundles but different from other clusters of flowers.  The organism was able to move its flowery limbs in a circle around the cave so that the flowers brushed across the fairies hanging on the walls.

There were two fairies who weren’t hung to the sides of the cave, and they stood at the small entrance […] that was connected to a tunnel.  The flower organism told them to bring water before it moved its limbs in a full circle around the cave or else it would kill one of the fairies on the wall.  […] the limp flower branches began to move; a bundle of flowered willow wands parted and engulfed a wall fairy within its colorful jaws as if to eat it.  But the organism was only playing, and it withdrew its deadly flowers from around its victim, leaving it unharmed.  Then this giant being moved its limbs and did the same to the next fairy and then to the next – all the while, slowly turning in a circle.  Finally, it got to the last fairy and parted its flowery wands, engulfing the delicate thing within a smother of beautiful, magic flowers.  The fairies on the ground cried, “Quick!  Where’s the water!  Bring it!  Bring it!”  The water had been right outside the entrance all along, but only now, at the very last minute, did they scurry to lug it into the cave in a pail.  However, it was too late.  The organism removed its flowers from around the fairy – and it was as if strings had been cut, for she fell from the wall and into the mouth of the burning chasm below.

[…] they fed the organism the water before somehow pulling the fallen fairy from the depths of the chasm.  She was unconscious – perhaps dead – as she [lay] there on the ground at the edge of the chasm.  She was a very pretty thing, with golden hair and a shimmering golden dress.  There was some water still left in the pail and the other ground fairies (there were now several of them) scurried to try to revive her with it.  It was some sort of magical water and I remember thinking as I looked on, Now that they have the water, they could do it – they could do anything.  But they […] couldn’t revive the fallen fairy.

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I was with a few friends whom I don’t recognize in […] reality.  We were inside a shop, or perhaps it was a restaurant, that had large, glass windows set inside of light tan, almost peach, walls.  We clustered close together beneath these windows, for outside, sniffing the ground right on the other side of the wall, was a brown retriever dog that was evil and mean-spirited[…].  It had a face that seemed all red, with blood-shot eyes, and when it growled, it displayed fangs like hundreds of tiny, white daggers.  It was a face that stood in stark contrast to its warm, furry body.

Suddenly, someone from the store ran up to us and informed us in a hurried, half-amazed, half-panicked way that Darth Vader […] was here.  […] [M]y friends and I were walking from the store [when] I said to them, “I don’t care if […] [Darth Vader] is reformed.  Personally, I’ll never forgive him for what he’s done.  Maybe his dog [the brown retriever] but never him.”  We passed Darth Vader as I was saying this.  He was in his usual attire – dark cape, dark mask […] – but I was surprised that he looked that way in public.  I expected him to wear something different.  He was sitting at a small table right outside the door that we left through and he seemed to be having tea and exchanging idle conversation with a simple, ordinary male citizen sitting across from him.  The day was warm and the roads weren’t paved […] – but the streets weren’t exactly dirt, either.  They were more like a strange sort of gravel and stones – like white concrete rubble […] crushed and scattered […].  The small houses were built of white plaster and hardened mud.  The entire place had an odd, Mexico feel to it.

We made our way […] to a very large truck that was quite tall but stout – like a strange, steel hayride carriage except without the hay and horse […].  We sat on top of it […] and looked down as Darth Vader approached and asked if he could join our team.  “Take off your mask!” [o]ne of my friends shouted down to him.  He obeyed and revealed a face red and badly scarred as if from a fire.  We looked upon him […], seemingly so naked and vulnerable without his mask, and my friends relented, letting him join.

At some point, […] my friends ceased to be human but became, instead, these giant turtles that talk and walk on their hind legs.  They were crime fighters – exactly like those from the cartoon […] Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.  There was a young, teenage girl that was with them.  She was their friend and also a crime fighter – human with average height and average build and hair that was blond[e] and cut around her ears.  She wasn’t ever ugly – just average looking most of the time – although sometimes, at certain angles, she would become fascinatingly beautiful.  I think she was me, or who I became.  Although the now maskless Darth Vader was still with the Turtles, he became, at the same time, a dark and evil enchantress inside a castle ruin – a separate entity from Vader and yet, not really so separate.

[…] The girl […] [was] within the enchantress’ castle[,] standing on a platform made of stone.  The enchantress was beside her, wearing a dark robe and addressing a few of her subjects who gathered at the foot of the platform.  I remember thinking of the girl, She’s switched sides! [b]ecause she resented the fact that Darth Vader had joined the Turtles.  She wanted nothing to do with Vader and was angry and upset – looking to get back at her friends for allowing him to join.  Thus she came to be on the enchantress’ side – this dark woman who was also a queen and who was tall and thin with pale skin, black eyes, and long, straight black hair.  The girl had become this queen’s most prized advisor […].  The two of them stood on that platform within that dark and ruined castle as the queen announced her plans for moving into a new hiding place – a new castle.

“No!” the girl suddenly interrupted.  “Not that castle, Your Highness!”  […] I saw that she was very beautiful, with long, golden hair tied back in a medieval fashion.  She was tall and thin and wearing a light blue, almost silver dress whose sleeves exposed her forearms.  She proceeded to show her queen a better alternative – a better castle to choose – and as she did so, a great pool of water opened […] above her head surrounded by a stone rim.  An identical pool opened […] near her waist and shimmering there beyond the dark ripples of the watery surface was an image of a stone castle – an image in each pool, like mirrors reflecting off of each other.  “You see, Your Highness?” she said, and reached up a hand to touch the image above her head.  As her fingers brushed across the cold surface of the pool, the image swirled away in white wisps – twisting into the darkness at her command.

“It’s the perfect castle!” [t]he enchantress queen responded, quite pleased.

And then these two women stole away to their new hiding place on a gondola that sailed silently across the night waters as it delivered them to that castle which sat in the middle of an island.  It was here that the Turtles discovered them and fought to break through the convoluted castle walls […].  They were already inside the castle, but couldn’t manage to break all the way in to the very heart of it where the enchantress resided.  The girl, who was average-looking once more and wearing only a shirt and pants (no fancy dress) [,] raced up through the layers of twisted walls to fight against the Turtles and to protect her queen.  She was able to ambush one Turtle, leaping off a ledge onto her opponent below.  They wrestled with each other […] on top of the stone walls before the Turtle said, “So, it’s you!”  He must have lost the struggle, for the girl then went on to a lower section of this complex wall to where four other Turtles were attempting to scale it with ropes.  They hung there next to each other when the girl struck one of them, who in turn swung sideways and struck the Turtle beside him unintentionally – it was like a domino effect of swinging Turtles.

Somehow, they were able to talk to the girl and persuade her to forgive Darth Vader and accept him for his reformed self.  She was able to do so and thus switched back to being on their side – no longer angry with them.  They were a team again, and that was the feeling I came away with when I [woke] from [this] dream.

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Forest of Death

I was standing in the middle of what looked like a dead forest – the bare remnants of some catastrophic fire.  But the trees weren’t burned, or charred, just dead and gray – like a bomb had exploded not far away and left in its wake these bare, silent sticks that rose into the air or fell naked across the ground.  And everywhere there were scattered dead people whose bodies were pierced through by the limbs of the trees – and thus they hung still in their death, with cold, gray branches stabbing through them – through their bellies, through their hearts, through their shoulders – like a most ghastly, grotesque, and twisted crucifixion.

I was aware that a young lady had brought me here – she was not with me but I could feel her presence almost like a ghostly image.  She was wearing green attire – a green, short-sleeved shirt with a long, green skirt that was intricately patterned and made of what seemed like a light, translucent fabric over a darker silk material.  She reminded me of a fairy.

But she was only a light image – very faint and brief in her presence – and I was alone in that forest filled with gruesome death.  I looked around for a moment at the bodies all around me – blue and decayed with dark rings of dried blood surrounding the places where the branches had [bored] holes clear through the flesh – and I screamed. […]

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